Perks of Working Out with Your Toddler

Looking after a baby is an around-the-clock job, which can make it hard to exercise regularly. However, working out will help you stay healthy and give you the energy you need to take care of your toddler. It’d be nice to find time each day to work out, but as most parents can attest to, this is more often than not easier said than done. Rather than trying to hire a nanny or getting relatives to babysit so you can exercise, why not get your kid involved in your routine?

While young children may not be able to participate in just any workout routine, there are many exercises you can do with your child that will benefit both of you. Strengthening muscles and burning calories will help you maintain a healthy weight and stave off illnesses. Young children will also benefit from these exercises, but the effects are far-reaching, as learning to exercise early can instill healthy behaviors that will last a lifetime. WebMD reported that a National Association for Sport and Physical Education committee recently developed a set of guidelines to help parents determine how much exercise their toddlers should be getting.

“The need for even the very young to be physically active is something parents often don’t understand,” James Clark, chair of the NASPE committee, told the source. “The earlier infants, toddlers and preschool children get exposure to daily movement and exercise, the better the likelihood of healthy development later in life.”

Squeeze in a rep or two when you can
Raising a baby will come with unexpected ups and down that make it nearly impossible to schedule a full workout into your day. Rather, certified personal trainer Angela Salveo explained to Good Housekeeping magazine that it’s best to do a little at a time when your child is in a good mood. Trying to stretch while your youngster is throwing a tantrum will leave you unfulfilled. Perks-of-Working-Out-with-your-Toddler.jpg

Looking after a baby is an around-the-clock job, which can make it hard to exercise regularly. However, working out will help you stay healthy and give you the energy you need to take care of your toddler. It’d be nice to find time each day to work out, but as most parents can attest to, this is more often than not easier said than done. Rather than trying to hire a nanny or getting relatives to babysit so you can exercise, why not get your kid involved in your routine?

While young children may not be able to participate in just any workout routine, there are many exercises you can do with your child that will benefit both of you. Strengthening muscles and burning calories will help you maintain a healthy weight and stave off illnesses. Young children will also benefit from these exercises, but the effects are far-reaching, as learning to exercise early can instill healthy behaviors that will last a lifetime. WebMD reported that a National Association for Sport and Physical Education committee recently developed a set of guidelines to help parents determine how much exercise their toddlers should be getting.

“The need for even the very young to be physically active is something parents often don’t understand,” James Clark, chair of the NASPE committee, told the source. “The earlier infants, toddlers and preschool children get exposure to daily movement and exercise, the better the likelihood of healthy development later in life.”

Squeeze in a rep or two when you can
Raising a baby will come with unexpected ups and down that make it nearly impossible to schedule a full workout into your day. Rather, certified personal trainer Angela Salveo explained to Good Housekeeping magazine that it’s best to do a little at a time when your child is in a good mood. Trying to stretch while your youngster is throwing a tantrum will leave you unfulfilled.

Teach basic skills while you work up a sweat
Whether you’re doing jumping jacks, lifting hand weights or counting down the seconds during a plank, doing so with your toddler can help you stay on track while also teaching him to count. You could also swap out numbers for letters to help your kid learn the alphabet.

Look for ‘Mommy and Me’ classes
Your gym or local community center may offer fitness classes specifically for parents and young children that get everyone moving. This is a great chance for parents to bond with their kids, whether doing yoga or just having free play in a gymnasium. The instructors will know how to get your toddler moving safely and happily.

Work out with your kid, literally
If your baby isn’t ready to actively participate, you can still involve him in your routine. Parenting magazine suggested doing “high-chair lunges” where you place your tiny tot in a high-chair (a stroller works too) and do lunges that bring you close. Each time you come up to your kid, you can make a silly face, blow him a kiss or tickle his tummy.

Looking after a baby is an around-the-clock job, which can make it hard to exercise regularly. However, working out will help you stay healthy and give you the energy you need to take care of your toddler. It’d be nice to find time each day to work out, but as most parents can attest to, this is more often than not easier said than done. Rather than trying to hire a nanny or getting relatives to babysit so you can exercise, why not get your kid involved in your routine?

While young children may not be able to participate in just any workout routine, there are many exercises you can do with your child that will benefit both of you. Strengthening muscles and burning calories will help you maintain a healthy weight and stave off illnesses. Young children will also benefit from these exercises, but the effects are far-reaching, as learning to exercise early can instill healthy behaviors that will last a lifetime. WebMD reported that a National Association for Sport and Physical Education committee recently developed a set of guidelines to help parents determine how much exercise their toddlers should be getting.

“The need for even the very young to be physically active is something parents often don’t understand,” James Clark, chair of the NASPE committee, told the source. “The earlier infants, toddlers and preschool children get exposure to daily movement and exercise, the better the likelihood of healthy development later in life.”

Squeeze in a rep or two when you can
Raising a baby will come with unexpected ups and down that make it nearly impossible to schedule a full workout into your day. Rather, certified personal trainer Angela Salveo explained to Good Housekeeping magazine that it’s best to do a little at a time when your child is in a good mood. Trying to stretch while your youngster is throwing a tantrum will leave you unfulfilled.

Teach basic skills while you work up a sweat
Whether you’re doing jumping jacks, lifting hand weights or counting down the seconds during a plank, doing so with your toddler can help you stay on track while also teaching him to count. You could also swap out numbers for letters to help your kid learn the alphabet.

Look for ‘Mommy and Me’ classes
Your gym or local community center may offer fitness classes specifically for parents and young children that get everyone moving. This is a great chance for parents to bond with their kids, whether doing yoga or just having free play in a gymnasium. The instructors will know how to get your toddler moving safely and happily.

Work out with your kid, literally
If your baby isn’t ready to actively participate, you can still involve him in your routine. Parenting magazine suggested doing “high-chair lunges” where you place your tiny tot in a high-chair (a stroller works too) and do lunges that bring you close. Each time you come up to your kid, you can make a silly face, blow him a kiss or tickle his tummy.

You can also try using your baby as added weight if you have a front carrier. Hold on to your kid for safety’s sake as you do squats and leg lifts. The added weight will provide more resistance and help you get the most out of your workout. As an added bonus, this might be a great option for calming a cranky child or even rocking him to sleep at nap time.

You can also try using your baby as added weight if you have a front carrier. Hold on to your kid for safety’s sake as you do squats and leg lifts. The added weight will provide more resistance and help you get the most out of your workout. As an added bonus, this might be a great option for calming a cranky child or even rocking him to sleep at nap time.

Teach basic skills while you work up a sweat
Whether you’re doing jumping jacks, lifting hand weights or counting down the seconds during a plank, doing so with your toddler can help you stay on track while also teaching him to count. You could also swap out numbers for letters to help your kid learn the alphabet.

Look for ‘Mommy and Me’ classes
Your gym or local community center may offer fitness classes specifically for parents and young children that get everyone moving. This is a great chance for parents to bond with their kids, whether doing yoga or just having free play in a gymnasium. The instructors will know how to get your toddler moving safely and happily.

Work out with your kid, literally
If your baby isn’t ready to actively participate, you can still involve him in your routine. Parenting magazine suggested doing “high-chair lunges” where you place your tiny tot in a high-chair (a stroller works too) and do lunges that bring you close. Each time you come up to your kid, you can make a silly face, blow him a kiss or tickle his tummy.

You can also try using your baby as added weight if you have a front carrier. Hold on to your kid for safety’s sake as you do squats and leg lifts. The added weight will provide more resistance and help you get the most out of your workout. As an added bonus, this might be a great option for calming a cranky child or even rocking him to sleep at nap time.

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